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Steve always watched The Simpsons when it was on lol

Your talent is awesome, Jali!
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One Step At A Time / Re: fighting depression and getting back in shape
« Last post by jali on April 20, 2024, 04:23:53 PM »
I've never watched Family Guy, but I recognise the guy on the sofa in front of the telly from screenshots or ads or something like that lol
,

I use to watch it back in the day, it's not bad, quite similar to the simpsons
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One Step At A Time / Re: fighting depression and getting back in shape
« Last post by Amanda_George on April 18, 2024, 06:27:39 PM »
I've never watched Family Guy, but I recognise the guy on the sofa in front of the telly from screenshots or ads or something like that lol
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The Lounge / Re: Members birthdays
« Last post by Pip on April 18, 2024, 04:08:56 PM »
 :bdayballoons: MoshyMonster
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Pagan/Heathen / Re: Crystals
« Last post by Amanda_George on April 18, 2024, 03:44:07 PM »
I've gone with what "feels" right so far, but I come with another crystal question for you all now... do displayed crystals prefer a glass, wood or no display cabinet please?

Right now my cleansed and programmed tumblestones are in a wood and glass display case and my clear quartz point and tiger's eye are on display in front of it, which is fine in the short term, but in the longer term, would it be better to invest in glass or wood for the display cabinets please?

TIA!
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One Step At A Time / Re: fighting depression and getting back in shape
« Last post by jali on April 18, 2024, 03:32:13 PM »
I just never "got" it... give me Red Dwarf any day though lol

sorry for the late reply, lol red dwarf was hilarious, ace rimmer and dwayn dibley would have me in stitches, another update, here is another animation, really enjoyed doing this one, it's in the style of the show, family guy,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzJxDHVpA0w
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The Lounge / Re: Members birthdays
« Last post by Amanda_George on April 18, 2024, 06:38:25 AM »
It's your turn today, MoshyMonster!

:signs0072:
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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13306703/Kemi-Badenoch-launches-scathing-attack-gender-ideology.html?login&param_code=c9r8eyfxj2lxbe1v6haz&param_state=eyJyZW1lbWJlck1lIjpmYWxzZSwicmFuZG9tU3RhdGUiOiIzOTM5MzQ0YS1kNTY5LTRjMTMtOGUwOS1iYzM0ODljZWI4MmQifQ%3D%3D&param__host=www.dailymail.co.uk&param_geolocation=row&base_fe_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2F&validation_fe_uri=%2Fregistration%2Fp%2Fapi%2Ffield%2Fvalidation%2F&check_user_fe_uri=registration%2Fp%2Fapi%2Fuser%2Fuser_check%2F&isMobile=false

Kemi Badenoch launches scathing attack on gender ideology 'cowardice' by police, the NHS and universities and demands 'more bravery and less cancel culture' over trans issues

By David Wilcock, Deputy Political Editor For Mailonline

Published: 11:43, 14 April 2024 | Updated: 11:58, 14 April 2024

Kemi Badenough today lashed out at 'cowardice' shown by public institutions over gender ideology.  The Equalities Minister launched a furious broadside at the police, NHS and universities, accusing them of failing to act impartially on the issue of trans rights and the treatment of children.  The Cass Review published last week said children have been let down by a lack of research and evidence on the use of puberty blockers and hormones.  The report by Dr Hilary Cass, first commissioned in 2020, concluded that gender care is currently an area of 'remarkably weak evidence' and young people have been caught up in a 'stormy social discourse'.  Writing in the Sunday Times today Ms Badenough, who is seen as a frontrunner to be the next Tory leader, attacked the 'cowardice of those in positions of influence', saying it was 'worse than the ravings of the militants'.    She also called for a review of how public bodies have conducted themselves.  'Over three decades, politicians of all parties have outsourced power to so-called independent institutions. They were meant to take the politics out of decision-making but have themselves become politicised, often with little to no ministerial oversight,' she wrote.

'They may be independent, but they are no longer impartial. As politicians ceded control, many institutions became captured by a minority of ideological activists.'

The report by Dr Hilary Cass, first commissioned in 2020, concluded that gender care is currently an area of 'remarkably weak evidence' and young people have been caught up in a 'stormy social discourse'.  Writing in the Sunday Times today Ms Badenough, who is seen as a frontrunner to be the next Tory leader, attacked the 'cowardice of those in positions of influence', saying it was 'worse than the ravings of the militants'.    She also called for a review of how public bodies have conducted themselves.   'Over three decades, politicians of all parties have outsourced power to so-called independent institutions. They were meant to take the politics out of decision-making but have themselves become politicised, often with little to no ministerial oversight,' she wrote.

'They may be independent, but they are no longer impartial. As politicians ceded control, many institutions became captured by a minority of ideological activists.'


Her intervention came as the Labour frontbencher admitted a major review published this week had made him realise 'there are lots of complexities'.

Hilary Cass's survey of NHS England gender identity services concluded trans children had been put on the path to irreversible change based on 'remarkably weak evidence'.  The report prompted NHS England to announce a 'Cass part two' review of adult gender services.  Ms Atkins said Labour had sought to downplay its rhetoric of the past decade by agreeing with Dr Cass's final recommendations.  After Dr Cass's report said 'the toxicity of the debate is exceptional', it emerged six NHS adult gender services had effectively blocked the review's research.  In a letter to NHS England's chief executive, Ms Atkins said there could be 'no further delay' on understanding the experience of 9,000 young patients of the now-shut gender service at the Tavistock Trust in London.  The adult gender dysphoria clinics to which Tavistock patients moved refused to take part in a study on the outcomes of treatment, which Ms Atkins described as 'disgraceful'.  NHS England has written to the trusts demanding the data is handed over and it has instructed an end to appointments for under-18s.
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Christian / Re: Devotions
« Last post by Pip on April 12, 2024, 11:58:47 AM »
https://proverbs31.org/read/devotions/full-post/2023/06/12/when-your-heart-is-a-muddy-mess?utm_campaign=Daily%20Devotions&utm_medium=email&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9-N-skJ9Anp5ZacbSQzjVDQkWAtIhnf5AJUt_lzEyFlEOBR5rK8eYw8olOCoDF-PBxG6zkktn2o2mU7611-YErUkjQsg&_hsmi=260470452&utm_content=260470452&utm_source=hs_email#disqus_thread

When Your Heart Is a Muddy Mess
June 12, 2023
by Kelly Basham, COMPEL Training Member

"Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me … For you will not delight in sacrifice, or I would give it; you will not be pleased with a burnt offering. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise." Psalm 51:10, 16-17 (ESV)

While scrolling through social media, I landed on a post that infuriated me. I know I shouldn’t have, but I read the comments.  Many of the responses were in retaliation to what this person shared in their post. My heart also yearned to leave a witty comeback. With my thumbs poised over my phone's keyboard, I tried to devise a reply to let this person know their post was wrong.  Several retorts came to mind, but I ultimately decided it was better to do nothing in my furious state, so I shut off my phone and tossed it on the couch.  Satisfied with my good behavior, I mentally patted myself on the back for my ability to exert such excellent self-control.  But as I went about my day, my thoughts tormented me.  Didn’t I do the right thing?

Isn’t God happy with my behavior?

Why don’t I have any peace about it?

Then God brought to my mind a familiar passage of Scripture: Psalm 51. Scholars suggest this psalm was written by David after Nathan the prophet confronted David regarding his sins against Bathsheba and his murder of her husband, Uriah (2 Samuel 11-12).  In his prayer, David said, “Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me … For you will not delight in sacrifice, or I would give it; you will not be pleased with a burnt offering. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise” (Psalm 51:10, 16-17).

David longed to be made right with God and understood that God wanted more than his empty sacrifices and burnt offerings; God wanted a sincerely repentant heart.  Doing the right thing is good in many ways, but it doesn’t change what’s in our hearts. Jesus tells us that sin starts in the heart (Matthew 15:18-19). If our sin isn’t dealt with at the core, it will grow out of control until it permeates our entire being, affecting our relationship with God.  Although I practiced self-control by not posting a comment, my heart was unrepentant. Outwardly I looked clean, but on the inside, my heart was a muddy mess that still oozed pride and fury. Despite my good behavior, I still needed to seek the Lord in true repentance.  Friends, we should always try to do the right thing but let’s not forget that God delights in hearts that are genuinely remorseful more than He delights in empty sacrifices of good behavior. Psalm 51:17 says, “a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.”

Admitting we are wrong is never easy, but as David explains, God doesn’t detest a repentant heart.  We can follow David’s example and bring ourselves to the Lord in wholehearted confession and repentance, without fear, for He is good to extend mercy and forgiveness to us just as He did to David.  Rather than presuming our good behavior is enough to make us right with God, let’s approach Him with a desire to be made clean and with a spirit that wants to be made right so we can enjoy our relationship with our heavenly Father.
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Depression Central / Psychological Pain and Suicidality in Patients With Depression
« Last post by Pip on April 12, 2024, 11:51:28 AM »
https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/psychological-pain-and-suicidality-in-patients-with-depression?ekey=RUtJRDpFOTIxNUQyMy03MkY0LTREOEUtQjRBRi1GNEI1RjcyQ0M4ODM%3D&utm_medium=email&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_EZVkHvYLdtIlqvmAvBxLfZPrqdO-c71tNxiO81CsefNV6mOSEYFE29mDQLeFcd3-r_Lnxs2WNPxL4DquFuRclAiiiLg&_hsmi=293363582&utm_content=293363582&utm_source=hs_email

Psychological Pain and Suicidality in Patients With Depression
February 7, 2024
Brian Miller, MD, PhD, MPH

CASE VIGNETTE

“Ms Hat” is a 52-year-old Caucasian female with a history of recurrent, severe major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features. She presents to the emergency room due to an overdose on an unknown sertraline and ziprasidone. Her mother called an ambulance due to concerns that the overdose was intentional and represented a suicide attempt. Ms Hat says she is not suicidal, but rather wants to “feel happier.”

She has been increasingly depressed in the past year due to the unexpected death of her brother from cardiovascular disease as well as witnessing the death of her beloved dog. She has voiced chronic passive suicidal ideation over the past year without a specific plan or intent. As Ms Hat’s psychiatrist, how would you manage her suicidality?

MDD is associated with an increased risk of suicide,1 so, identifying risk factors for and predictors of suicide in this patient population is crucial. Psychological pain (psychache) is an important factor in understanding suicide.2,3

Psychological pain is characterized by intense feelings of shame, humiliation, anguish, despair, loneliness, and dread,4 as well as feelings of failure, abandonment, and belief that the pain is irreversible.5 Suicide may be viewed as the only means of escaping psychological pain that exceeds an individual’s threshold of tolerance.

Higher levels of psychological pain are associated with increased suicide risk.6,7 A previous meta-analysis explored the impact of psychological pain in suicide,8 but the role of depression in this relationship remains unclear.

The Current Study

Wang and colleagues9 performed a meta-analysis of the relationship between psychological pain and suicidality in MDD. The investigators systematically searched PubMed, Web of Science, and PsyINFO according to PRISMA guidelines. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42023416018).

Inclusion criteria were studies in English; studies with participants who had been diagnosed with MDD according to DSM or ICD criteria; empirical papers with quantitative research; studies in which psychological pain is clearly defined and measured with a standardized instrument; studies that assessed suicidality; and studies that quantified the association between psychological pain and suicidality. Exclusion criteria were studies that lacked data on psychological pain or measured psychological pain using a non-validated scale.

Two authors independently assessed the studies, extracted the data, and assessed study quality. Data were analyzed using a random effects meta-analysis model. Risk of bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger’s test.

Seven papers, comprising 1364 participants, met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Across all studies, psychological pain was associated with a significant increased odds of suicidality in patients with MDD (OR=1.32). Between-study heterogeneity was high. The association between psychological pain and suicidality was significantly moderated by (older) age, but not gender.

Egger’s test was significant for potential publication bias. However, in post-hoc analyses, the association between psychological pain and suicidality remained significant in both “leave one out” meta-analysis (ORs=1.18-1.69) and the Duval and Tweedie trim-and-fill method (OR=1.20).

Study Conclusions

The investigators concluded that psychological pain was associated with increased odds of suicidality in MDD. This association was moderated by older age, but not gender. Between-study heterogeneity was significant, and there was evidence of potential publication bias, but the association remained significant in post-hoc analyses.

Study strengths include the large cumulative sample size. Study limitations include heterogeneity in scales used to assess psychological pain, the definition of suicidality, and the cross-sectional design of included studies.

The Bottom Line

Psychological pain is associated with increased odds of suicidality with MDD, particularly in the elderly. Psychological pain is an important treatment target in this patient population toward suicide prevention.

Dr Miller is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at Augusta University in Georgia. He is on the Editorial Board and serves as the schizophrenia section chief for Psychiatric Times®. The author reports that he receives research support from Augusta University, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Stanley Medical Research Institute.

References

1. Heuschen CBBCM, Mocking RJT, Zantvoord JB, et al. Suicidal ideation in remitted major depressive disorder predicts recurrence. J Psychiatr Res. 2022;151:65-72.

2. Mee S, Bunney BG, Bunney WE, et al. Assessment of psychological pain in major depressive episodes. J Psychiatr Res. 2011;45(11):1504-1510.

3. Shneidman ES. Suicide as psychache. J Nerv Ment Dis. 1993;181(3):145-147.

4. Shneidman ES. Perspectives on suicidology. Further reflections on suicide and psychache. Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1998;28(3):245-250.

5. Orbach I, Mikulincer M, Sirota P, Gilboa-Schechtman E. Mental pain: a multidimensional operationalization and definition. Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2003;33(3):219-230.

6. Chen S, Cheng Y, Zhao W, Zhang Y. Psychological pain in depressive disorder: a concept analysis. J Clin Nurs. 2023;32(13-14):4128-4143.

7. Levi-Belz Y, Gvion Y, Grisaru S, Apter A. When the pain becomes unbearable: case-control study of mental pain characteristics among medically serious suicide attempters. Arch Suicide Res. 2018;22(3):380-393.

8. Ducasse D, Holden RR, Boyer L, et al. Psychological pain in suicidality: a meta-analysis. J Clin Psychiatry. 2018;79(3):16r10732.

9. Wang T, Yang L, Yang L, et al. The relationship between psychological pain and suicidality in patients with major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis. J Affect Disord. 2024;346:115-121.
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