Author Topic: BPD  (Read 23095 times)

captainkeefy

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Re: BPD
« Reply #165 on: March 06, 2013, 06:24:51 PM »
I told him I went to bits when he cancelled the last appointment and he said "I was ill?!" I said "I know but it triggered my abandonment issue." He said he thinks my abondonment issue affects my behaviour on a daily basis. He said he didn't  think that C.B.T. Was useful for me, he said my emotions run to deep. He said he is going to speak to the specialist personality services and see if they will see me. Hopefully I get a diagnosis off the psychiatrist next week so then at least I know where I stand.
Affectus, qui passio est, desinit esse passio simulatque eius claram et distinctam formamus ideam.

Emotion, which is suffering, ceases to be suffering as soon as we form a clear and precise picture of it.

Catbrian

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Re: BPD
« Reply #166 on: March 06, 2013, 07:41:20 PM »
IMO, the Therapist should understand the cancellation issue, whether a client has abandonment issues, or not.  Most people, following TWO cancellations would feel "their space/time" was not being valued.  Although, I do think he could be right about you facing abandonment issues on a daily basis.  I think you already recognised this about yourself last week.

Apparently, according to the National Alliance for Mental Illness (N.A.M.I), the most useful form of psychotherapy for people with a PD is Dialectical Behavioural Therapy.  You will probably find that the specialist service you're being referred too will have that as part of the Care Plan.

Catbrian

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Re: BPD
« Reply #167 on: March 06, 2013, 08:27:08 PM »

captainkeefy

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Re: BPD
« Reply #168 on: March 06, 2013, 09:24:17 PM »
Hi Catb,

D.B.T. is specifically designed for people with BPD and from what I read is the most beneficial type of psychotherapy for people with a PD. I read that 60% of the population suffer from a personality disorder but they all belong on a spectrum from minor to severe. With BPD I get the impression that it goes from someone who can get depressed after a hard time in work right the way down to people who regularly have break downs. These are known as the low functioning borderlines, these people make up 1% of the population.

The things that stand out for me was that I went the doctor when I went AWOL from the army and his wrote F.N.D. On my sick note. My mum said this is terminology for f'ing nuisance to the doctor. However, when I looked it up on the net it said Functioning neurological disorder. It's got me curious if this is how a GP would describe a PD. plus I had a head scan once when I got attacked, I wonder if anything got picked up then?

Six months ago if anyone told me I had an abandonment issue I would have laughed at them. The more I think about it the more I realise how it's affected me. Hopefully with this knowledge and some therapy I can make a lot more productive life for myself. I think my problem is I set really high standards for myself to try and prove myself worthy as a person, from now on I think my happiness is going to be my priority. At least knowing my flaws gives me a more realistic perspective on my life.


Affectus, qui passio est, desinit esse passio simulatque eius claram et distinctam formamus ideam.

Emotion, which is suffering, ceases to be suffering as soon as we form a clear and precise picture of it.

Catbrian

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Re: BPD
« Reply #169 on: March 06, 2013, 09:58:55 PM »